ABOUT SPENCER TRACY

Edmund Brown

"The minute you see Spencer Tracy on the screen you are immediately transfixed on his humanity. Whether he plays a poor man, a wise-cracking sportswriter, the father of the bride, or the defender of a great cause, in the end, Spencer Tracy truly is the heroic Santiago from Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea, courageously battling the sharks that would tear apart his dignity and life’s work. No other actor had his gift."


Upton Bell, New England radio and television talk show host whose mother, Broadway actress and comedienne Frances Bell, starred with Eddie Cantor in Whoopee! and the Ziegfeld Follies of 1928, in the early talkie Night Work, and in one of the first experimental television broadcasts in New York City with Gertrude Lawrence and Lionel Atwill. She was a great admirer of Tracy when he was on the New York stage.


One of the most versatile and popular movie stars of the twentieth century, Spencer Tracy’s life and career spanned sixty-seven tumultuous years of twentieth-century American history, including two world wars, the Great Depression, technological advances, the emergence of the nuclear age, the cold war, and the rise of the women’s and civil rights movements.

Spencer Tracy, Academy Award–winning superstar of the silver screen, quintessential natural actor, and family man --  the leading man named by the American Film Institute as the ninth greatest male movie star in the history of American cinema.

Behind the scenes, Spencer Tracy faced personal and professional challenges without parallel or precedent. His story is an inspiring legacy.